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Thursday, April 30, 2020 | History

3 edition of Economic and demographic change in Africa found in the catalog.

Economic and demographic change in Africa

Economic and demographic change in Africa

  • 353 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Clarendon Press in Oxford .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Population -- Congresses.,
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Economic conditions -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementeditors, Archie Mafeje, Samir Radwan.
    SeriesInternational studies in demography
    ContributionsRadwan, Samir., Mafeje, Archie.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination173p. ;
    Number of Pages173
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21172779M
    ISBN 100198288921


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Economic and demographic change in Africa Download PDF EPUB FB2

Demographic Change in Africa. There is no doubt: Africa will dominate global population dynamics in the 21 st century. While public attention is still focused on Asia’s demography with its currently billion inhabitants as a fast-growing and prospering market, today’s one billion sub-Saharan Africans have significantly outpaced Asia in terms of annual population growth (%.

Get this from a library. Economic and demographic change in Africa. [Archie Economic and demographic change in Africa book Samīr Muḥammad Raḍwān;] -- Using a variety of different approaches, arguments and sets of data, the contributors to this book examine the complex relationship between current population growth rates and economic conditions in.

This book examines the promises as well as the challenges the demographic dividend brings to sub-Saharan Africa as fertility rates in the region fall and the labor force grows.

It offers a detailed analysis of what conditions must be met in order for the region to take full economic advantage of ongoing population : Hardcover. economic growth, health, fragility, and human development, and as such it is extremely Economic and demographic change in Africa book.

However, the nature of the impact of demographic change is not set in stone. The most important lesson from this book is that the right policies can help countries to reap the benefits of demographic change on the overall development of a nation.

change. Economic and demographic change in Africa book throughout the region demographic change continues: fertility rates continue to fall and are below replacement in many Asian countries, and life expectancy is steadily increasing.

In this paper, we examine the robustness of demographic factors in explaining economic growth throughout Asia, with particular attention to East Asia. More about Economic and demographic change in Africa book item Book Chapters The following chapters of this book are listed in IDEAS.

Ansley J. Coale, "Introduction to "Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries"," NBER Chapters, in: Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries, pagesNational Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Halvor Gille, "An International. As its unemployment rate sits at 25%, South Africa is clearly in a labour market crisis. To set itself up for long-term economic growth and development, and maximize the poverty-reducing power of its economic growth, the country needs not only to create jobs but to address trends in the structure of its workforce.

Harnessing the demographic. Geography, Demography, and Economic Growth in Africa Africa's poor economic growth has been chronic rather than epi- -demographic change: in. Demographic change is a well-studied phenomenon in most societies.

Its impact on social systems and economy has been discussed for some years. Current demographic trends raise new questions, challenges and controversies.

Comparing demographic trends in Europe and the NAME-region (North Africa and the Middle East), this book demonstrates how population change interacts with changing economic landscapes, social distinctions and political by: 7.

South Africa economic update: jobs and South Africa’s changing demographics (English) Abstract. Global growth hit a soft patch at the start Economic and demographic change in Africa book In the first quarter it slowed to percent, quarter on quarter (q/q) annualized, from percent in the fourth quarter of Africa’s demographic transition: dividend or disaster.

(English) Abstract. The demographic dividend describes the interplay between changes in a population’s age structure due to the demographic transition and rapid economic growth.

Except for a few countries in Southern Africa and some island nations, fertility rates and youth Cited by: Demographic changes are only magnifying the significance of the economic rise of the South. The UN estimates that the ‘more developed’ world contained 18% of the world's population in but predicts that its share will fall to 13% by as Europe's share slips from 11 to 7% while Africa's share increases from 15 to 28%.

In absolute terms, however, Africa’s ongoing demographic transition is the largest in history, and because African countries are at earlier stages of development, they face a greater challenge in dealing with the implications of demographic change for agriculture and rural by: 1.

Africa’s demographic dynamics are shaping its present and future development agenda. Perhaps the greatest and most fundamental challenge is to address the economic and social development issues of a continent that will be home to billion people in the next 10 years.

The second is economic policies that take advantage of the opportunity offered by demography. While demographic change can produce more, and high quality, workers, this potential workforce needs to be productively employed if Africa is to reap the : Paperback.

Book Description. The Political Economy of Africa addresses the real possibilities for African development in the coming decades when seen in the light of the continent’s economic performance over the last half-century. This involves an effort to emancipate our thinking from the grip of western economic models that have often ignored Africa’s diversity in their rush to.

The second trend is what economists refer to as the “demographic dividend,” or the economic benefits that accrue to an economy when a massive influx of young people enter the labor force, triggering increases in both economic productivity and the savings rate.

Sub-Saharan Africa’s opportunity to escape from poverty is real and opportune, but the delayed demographic transition to low mortality and low fertility poses a serious risk. Without a faster demographic transition, Africa is likely to experience an unmanageable surge of population, youth dependency, etc.

The demographic transition would combine greatly improved health Cited by: 1. Book Description. Current demographic trends raise new questions, challenges and controversies. Comparing demographic trends in Europe and the NAME-region (North Africa and the Middle East), this book demonstrates how population change interacts with changing economic landscapes, social distinctions and political realities.

I – Demographic Dynamics and Sustainability in Africa - Kwame Ameyaw Domfeh ©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) France Germany United Kingdom Europe Italy South Africa Tanzania Algeria Africa Nigeria Source: CIA World Fact Book, December Table 3. Economic growth itself will be correlated to the age structure of the population.

In this report we present an in-depth analysis on demographic change and economic growth and contrast our findings with the results in the EPC report We provide a review of the recent literature that links changes in the demographicFile Size: 1MB.

Demography is destiny, and the decline in the world’s labor force is a crucial reason for pessimism about the global economy. Governments can offer incentives to boost fertility rates, but that won’t be enough—so the world should brace itself for slower growth and fewer economic standouts in the decades to by: 1.

African futures Key trends to Julia Bello-Schünemann, Jakkie Cilliers, Zachary Donnenfeld, Ciara Aucoin and Alex Porter Africa is undergoing several major transitions, including demographic, economic, technological, urban and socio-political.

These transitions are all connected, and together they will shape the future of the Size: KB. 3 ways to get Africa's informal economy on the books. The issue is compounded by Africa’s demographic dividend, with the informal sector projected to absorb many of the continent’s young employment-seekers.

How COVID will change China and Africa's economic relationship. Africa’s demographic trends reveal a growing aging population and unprecedented growth of the youth population. Population aging is expected to accelerate between andas more people live to age Projections show that the elderly could account for % of the population by from % in (Graph 7).File Size: KB.

This report reviews the debate over the effects of demographic change on economic growth and examines the research evidence on the economic impact of changes in age structure.

It also examines the relationship between population change and economic devel-opment in particular regions of the world, including East Asia, LatinFile Size: KB. These interactive processes reflected not only colonial objectives, but also the nature of the societies that Europeans encountered.

Demographic trends were a barometer of economic and social change as well as a formative influence upon it. Cited by: This report reviews the debate over the effects of demographic change on economic growth and examines the research evidence on the economic impact of changes in age structure.

It also examines the relationship between population change and economic development in particular regions of the world, including East Asia, Latin America, sub-Saharan.

(A demographic dividend is the accelerated economic growth that can result from improved reproductive health, a rapid decline in fertility, and the subsequent shift in age structure and dependency ratios.) The Gates Institute supported the publication of Dr.

Dramani’s book—the first of its kind to be written by an African researcher. It gives the average slice of the economic pie per person. HDI A tool developed by the United Nations to measure and rank countries' levels of social and economic development based on four criteria: Life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling, expected years of schooling and gross national income per capita.

The book compares Ethiopia with other Africa countries, and demonstrates the uniqueness of an African-type demographic transition: a combination of poverty-related negative factors (unemployment, disease, food insecurity) along with positive education, health and higher age-of-marriage trends that are pushing this ruggedly rural and land-locked.

The “demographic dividend” refers to the process through which a changing age structure can spur economic growth. It depends, of course, on several complex factors, including the nature and pace of demographic change, the operation of labor and capital markets, macroeconomic management and trade policies, governance, and human capital.